Supreme Court nominee dishes out mac and cheese to homeless

Christopher Davidson
July 12, 2018

The vetting of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is just beginning, but his public financial disclosures make one thing clear: He's not as wealthy as many already on the high court.

On Monday night, President Donald Trump announced his nominee for the newest Supreme Court justice, Brett Kavanaugh.

Despite Barber's optimism, Brad Dacus - founder of Pacific Justice Institute - admits he has some concerns about Kavanaugh.

Democrats, who are in the minority, may not be able to block him, but they argue that Kavanaugh would shift the court further to the right, potentially threatening access to abortion and undermining the Affordable Care Act. But Democrats will cast Kavanaugh as part of the same Washington "swamp" Trump vowed to drain.

Senate majority leader Chuck Schumer is going to have enough trouble getting all Red-State Democrats to vote against Kavanaugh, let alone getting any Republicans to vote no.

"In doing so, Kavanaugh invoked Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes and the lessons of the court in the early 20th century: "(H) istory and precedent counsel caution before reaching out to decide hard constitutional questions too quickly, especially when the underlying issues are of lasting significance. Justice Stephen Breyer is the richest, with assets of $6.4 million to $16.6 million.

When Trump finally tapped Neil Gorsuch to fill the vacancy, McConnell resorted to changing procedural rules so he could be approved by a simple majority instead of the traditional 60-40 threshold. Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer has promised to protect abortion rights. With ailing Republican John McCain unable to vote, they have little wiggle room.

If McCaskill, Heitkamp, Donnelly and Manchin vote against confirmation and the GOP comes up a single vote short, each one of the vulnerable Democrats becomes the "deciding" vote against a conservative, well-credentialed Supreme Court nominee who was selected by a president popular with Republicans.

Thailand cave rescue: ‘Everybody will be out TODAY’ Eleventh person rescued
Since then, Thai and worldwide divers and specialists have been strategizing how to safely extract the boys and their coach. Efforts were again suspended for the day Monday after the second set of four boys were extracted.

The newly-nominated justice on Tuesday went to the US Capitol to begin meeting with senators ahead of any confirmation hearings to explain his positions.

As for religious freedom, Barber says Kavanaugh has a 100-percent rating in decisions he has written, so Barber has guarded optimism about Kavanaugh as he faces a grueling process and a lot of liberal opposition to confirmation as a justice.

Kavanaugh grew up in Washington as the son of a schoolteacher. "We who believe that a woman has the right to make her own medical decisions, we now must fight!"

Later, he worked on Bill Clinton's impeachment over a sexual relationship with a White House intern.

"At this time the Kavanaughs have no debt beyond their home mortgage", Shah said.

The White House did not say how much of the debt came from ticket purchases, or name the friends involved in the transactions. Special counsel Robert Mueller, of course, is now investigating potential collusion between Russian Federation and the Trump campaign during the 2016 election.

Karl asked Fallon if he and other Democrats are "entirely misstating" Kavanaugh's view of executive power, noting that in a 2009 Minnesota Law Review article, Kavanaugh explicitly said that Congress "might consider exempting a president" from criminal prosecution and investigations because there is "no constitutional protection".

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