Spanish train firm to create 1,000 jobs at new factory in Scotland

Irving Hamilton
November 15, 2018

Additional jobs will be created during the planning and construction phase.

Talgo, which designs, makes and services trains in 28 countries, said it wanted to develop an "all Britain" strategy to ensure parts were manufactured across the country rather than assembled from elsewhere.

Work will not begin, however, until the company has received orders for new trains in Britain.

An "innovation centre" will also be established at Chesterfield in Derbyshire.

That site had also been considered for the factory.

The firm said the factory will get the go ahead if it wins the deal to build over 50 trains.

It is thought that the former branch line that once ran to the power station may also be reinstated as a result of the development.

The investment news comes two years after the closure of the power station that long stood at the site.

Opened in 1973, Longannet's coal fired power station was the last of its kind in Scotland and closed its doors for good back in March 2016, leading to 230 job losses.

After fake moon, China trying to create an artificial sun
In terms of raw materials, deuterium and tritium required for nuclear fusion are nearly inexhaustible in the ocean. Though development of fusion technology began roughly 60 years ago, it has yet to create a viable energy source.

"The quality and skills of the workforce in the Fife area, combined with the strength of the business environment, will help Talgo realise its vision of establishing a world-class high value manufacturing facility for the rail sector, bringing benefits to Fife, Scotland and the United Kingdom as a whole".

It was picked from an initial list of 30 possible locations and workers there will be building high-speed trains capable of running at up to 235mph.

Fife is in line for at least 1,000 new jobs with the announcement the region has been chosen for a major rail industry investment.

"The rail infrastructure in place was key to the company choosing this site, and I'm excited to see how this can pave the way for more innovative and ambitious freight and passenger rail in Scotland".

Paul Lewis, managing director of Scottish Government agency Scottish Development International, said the plans offered "considerable benefits".

However, as he welcomed the news, Transport Secretary Michael Matheson cautioned that the deal is not yet done, saying: "This investment is a significant achievement for Scotland and yet another endorsement of our country's attractiveness to worldwide investors".

Spanish rolling stock engineering company Talgo, which specialises in manufacturing fast, lightweight trains for countries like the US and Saudi Arabia, announced this morning the Longannet site - which has been undergoing a process of demolition - is the preferred location for its new factory.

"However, the full economic impact of such an investment, and the supply chain opportunities it would bring, would be felt right across Scotland". "Talgo wants to see a steady supply of engineers and other skilled people enter the workforce, and be the innovators of the future".

"The quality and skills of the workforce in the Fife area, combined with the strength of the business environment, will help Talgo realise its vision of establishing a world-class high value manufacturing facility for the rail sector".

Other reports by

Discuss This Article

FOLLOW OUR NEWSPAPER